Ruby & Nora

Published on May 26th, 2011 by

—– Original Message —–
From: nora.marsden@gmail.com
To: rubesmarsden85@hotmail.co.uk
Sent: 26/08/2011 19:36
Subject: Just to say hi

Dear Ruby,
Just testing out my new Email capabilities. I took a course at the Community Centre on how to use computers. I enjoyed it so much! So I went out and bought myself a little computer, got the nice lad Dennis from the village grocery to set it up for me. This might come as a surprise, given that you’ve always chided me for not even owning a TV, but there you go.
I remembered that I had your email address from a long time ago; you gave it to me, you were excited that you’d signed up in class. “If you ever get the internet Granny,” you said, “you can send me letters.” You were 11 then, just started big school and wanted to show me what you were doing. Of course, I didn’t even have a computer then so I wrote you a letter. I saw you later that day and you laughed; “nobody uses the post nowadays Granny” you said, but I could tell how much you’d enjoyed receiving it. And sure enough, a couple of days later you wrote back to me. We wrote to each other every few days for almost a year, do you remember Ruby? You didn’t always post yours, I wouldn’t have expected you to pay for stamps at that age. You’d bring them round and tuck them under the fruit bowl. I’d pretend not to see it until after you’d left.
I used to love reading your letters, Ruby. Hope you’re well.
Love,
Granny Nora

Continue Reading

The Clockwork Soldier

Published on May 26th, 2011 by

The Clockwork Soldier

Once, a long time ago, there was a toymaker who lived in a small village. He made toys for everyone, from the children to the adults who fancied something to show off at dinner parties. The Toymaker made every kind of toy, from jigsaw puzzles to dolls to model train sets, but the thing he specialised in most was clockwork toys. Many children squealed with delight every Christmas as they opened tore apart colourful wrapping to reveal the Toymaker’s latest design. A crocodile who softly snapped his jaws. A bear who played on a marching drum. A motorcar that would drive around in a huge circle. Every year the Toymaker worked diligently to perfect his latest masterpiece, and every year he would call in three lucky children from the village to test the toys.

Continue Reading
http://www.ashtonraze.com/wp-content/themes/smokeandmirrors